The science of sunshine

The last few days have been really quite beautiful here in Blighty. The sun has been shining, the birds have been tweeting and the blossom is venturing out into the spring.

Everyone in our household is happier. We’re pretty content to begin with, most of the time, but in recent days it has gone up a level. We have more energy, we have more patience, we are more hopeful and I can only attribute all of these overnight changes to the weather.

It’s not a secret that sunshine improves your mood but the level to which it has done so this year has made me ponder.

It’s also not a secret that we Brits like to talk about the weather but on this occasion it’s a little deeper than that. I’m curious to know why this increase in natural daylight and warmth can have such a tangible effect on us. In the same vein, I’d like to understand why drinking water makes me feel better, why sugar makes me feel worse and why exercise is so difficult to start but so rewarding when done.

I know the basic principles of brain neurons and hormones but I’d like to understand it a little better in order truly to move towards a healthier lifestyle designed to treat my body the way it was created to be taken care of.

The problem is, I’m not quite sure where to start. I read a fantastic book recently, which I’ve blogged about before, called The Brain. It was informative but very accessible and what I learned helped life make a bit more sense. I’m looking for something similar, but that takes it to the next stage, looking at the science of sunshine and exploring what lifestyle choices we can make to give our bodies and minds the opportunity to thrive.

If anyone knows of such a book – could you link it my way…?

In the meantime, I’m going to soak up some Vitamin D, revel in this deeper-rooted calm that has taken up residence inside me and see if I can coax it to stick around.

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My Ulysses contract

I’ve recently read The Brain: The Story of You┬áby David Eagleman. I had asked my husband for a psychology type book for my birthday that wasn’t too academic but explored some interesting facts about the way we think. This book was just the ticket and one concept (of many!) that stood out to me was of the Ulysses contract. The author explains it briefly here:

 

There a few things I thought I could use such a contract with my future self:

  1. CBT – anxious thoughts
  2. Healthy eating
  3. Social media scrolling

Firstly, anxious thoughts. I’m a worrier. I went to an excellent seminar this year about mindfulness and resilience (the talk can be purchased here). One of the ideas that the speaker, Shaun Lambert, used, was of a train. We can choose to be the train and say to ourselves ‘I am an anxious person’ or we can choose to get off the train, stand on the platform and say ‘I have some anxious thoughts.’ As we watch the train go past, we can decide which carriages or thoughts to get on but we can equally choose not to get on at all.

The only Ulysses type contract I could come up with for this is to plan tasks and activities that bring me fulfilment and have to be done on a certain day – essentially not giving myself the time to get on the train. This contract needs work as it’s certainly not iron clad.

Secondly, healthy eating. There are two things I plan to do here. One is not to buy unhealthy treats and the other is to buy healthy treats. I’m a grazer. Snacks help me to concentrate, keep my energy up and also bring me joy. It’s not the sugar, it’s having something little to look forward to.

Finally, social media scrolling. It’s one of my worst habits. I’ve written before about how soul destroying I find this 21st century activity. Yet it doesn’t stop me from doing it. Humans can be so fickle. Ironically, the contract I’m considering here involves an app. Specifically, one that tracks the amount of time I spend on social media and potentially alerts someone if I exceed a pre-determined time. Essentially, pride becomes my contract.

I’m not sure the above are quite bullet-proof just yet, but it’s a start, right?